logo logo

Samuel Sheldon

Samuel Sheldon, American electrical engineer. Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, Brooklyn Institute Arts and Sciences.

Background

  • Sheldon, Samuel was born on March 8, 1862 in Middlebury, Vermont, United States. Son of Harmon Alexander and Mary (Bass) Sheldon.

  • Education

    • Bachelor of Arts, Middlebury College, 1883, A.M., 1886. Doctor of Philisophy, University of Würzburg, 1888. Assistant to Kohlrausch, distinguished physicist, with whom he was associated in his celebrated determination of the ohm.

      (Doctor of Science, University of Pennsylvania, 1906. Doctor of Science, Middlebury College, 1911).

    Career

    • Assistant in physics, Harvard, 1888-1889. Professor physics and electrical engineering, Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn, since 1889. President department electricity Brooklyn Institute Arts and Sciences.

      Consulting engineer and frequently called to give expert testimony in state and federal cts. Expert of Swiss Department of Justice and Police, since 1903. Secretary section B, International Elec.

      Congress, 1904; member International Elec. Jury of Awards, St. Louis Exposition, 1904.

    Works

    • Author: Dynamo Electric Machinery, 1900-1903. Alternating Current Machines (joint author), 1902. Electric Traction and Transmission Engineering (joint author), 1911.

      Physics Laboratory Experiments (joint author).

    Membership

    Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, Brooklyn Institute Arts and Sciences.

    Connections

    • Married Frances Warner Putnam, June 18, 1891.
    • father: Harmon Alexander Sheldon
    • mother: Mary (Bass) Sheldon
    • spouse: Frances Warner Putnam
    See on larger map
    Died September 4, 1920
    (aged 58)
    Nationality