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Jiguang Qi (Yuanjing, Nantang, Mengzhu)

Qi Jiguang was a general, who battled against Pirates. For more than 10 years, Qi Jiguang led his fleet to fend off many attacks in the coastal areas. He was best remembered for his courage and leadership in the fight against Japanese pirates along the east coast of China, as well as his reinforcement work on the Great Wall of China.

Background

  • Jiguang was born into a military family. When he was 17, he was assigned the important role of resisting invasion by foreign forces. His ambition was "not to be elevated as a duke, but to achieve peace on the seas." His forefather served as a military leader under Zhu Yuanzhang and died in battle.

  • Career

    • Qi Jiguang fought in no less than 80 large and small battles before finally eradicating his enemies. Qi Jiguang was honoured as a national hero, and the army he led became known as the 'Army of Qi". Qi Jiguang guarded the Min, Zhe and Yue coastal areas from foreign attacks.

      In AD 1555. Qi Jiguang assumed duty at Zhejiang. A group of 50 to 60 pirates penetrated deep into the region after they landed. They killed and robbed wherever they went. They crossed the new pass in the north of Hangzhou and entered Lang county in Anhui via Chun’an. They moved near Wuhu, circled round Nanjing, and moved to Yixing before finally turning back to Wujin. Although this group was eliminated, it is believed that they killed more than 4.000 Ming soldiers.

      Soon after Qi Jiguang arrived at Zhedong, he victorious war against the pirates at Longshan. He coordinated operations with the people in Cixi and won all three battles that he fought with the pirates.

      During the 16 years that Qi Jiguang held office at Jizhou, he displayed extraordinary valour and military ingenuity in defeating the pirate raiders. He rose to prominence and restored peace in Jizhou. He was honoured as a brilliant general with a clear conscience.

    Major achievements

    • In AD 1561, Qi Jiguang was victorious in his battles against the Japanese pirates in Taizhou. For his achievements, he was made commander.

    Works

    • The New Book on Effective Discipline
    • The Records of Military Training

    Connections

    • father: Qi Jingtong
      Qi Jingtong was an honest and upright man. He cultivated in his son a yearning for knowledge as well as a firm set of morals.
    Jiguang Qi
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    Born November 12, 1527
    Died January 5, 1588
    (aged 60)
    Nationality
    Ethnicity:

    Contributor  

    Глеб Люштык last changed 14/05/2013 view changes
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    • Works
      • Treatise: The Records of Military Training
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