logo logo

Steven GLOBERMAN

Steven GLOBERMAN, economist in the field of International Business; Industrial Organisation and Public Policy; Economics of Technological Change. Founders Day Award Excellence Graduate Studies, 1971; Research Staff, Canadian Royal Commission Corporation Concentration, 1976-1977; Adviser, Economics Council Canada Research Program Technological Change, 1981, Consumer and Corporation Affairs, Canada, Canada’s Intellectual Property Legislation, since 1981.

Background

  • GLOBERMAN, Steven was born in 1946 in New York City, New York, United States of America.

  • Education

    • Bachelor of Arts Brooklyn College, 1966. Master of Arts University of California, Los Angeles, Calif., United States of America, 1967. Doctor of Philosophy New York University, NYC, New York, USA, 1971.

    Career

    • Assistant Professor, York University, Toronto, 1971-1977. Senior Economics Imperial Oil Ltd., 1975-1977. Association Professor, York University, 1977-1980.

      Visiting Association Professor, University California Irvine, 1977-1978. University British Columbia, 1980-1981. Professor Business Administration, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada, since 1981.

      Editorial Board, J Cultural Economics, 1978-1981.

    Major achievements

    • Founders Day Award Excellence Graduate Studies, 1971. Research Staff, Canadian Royal Commission Corporation Concentration, 1976-1977. Adviser, Economics Council Canada Research Program Technological Change, 1981, Consumer and Corporation Affairs, Canada, Canada’s Intellectual Property Legislation, since 1981.

    Views

    My early work concentrated on the relationship between market structure and technological change, following work on that topic as a graduate student. A consulting assignment for the Ontario Arts Council in the early 1970s led me to pursue research into the economics of cultural industries. This interest has continued to the present. In the mid-1970s, I undertook a fairly major study of technological diffusion in Canada.

    TTie results suggested that although the sample innovations were well known to Canadian managers, the latter were generally slower than their American and United States counterparts to adopt these innovations. Over the latter half of the 1970s, I examined reasons for the slower rate of technological diffusion in Canada and expanded my examination to consider the adoption performances of Canadian service industries. Much of this work was summarised recently in the Economic Council of Canada’s 1983 Annual Report, in which the council recommended that more attention be paid to technological diffusion and less to the performance of research and development.

    More recently, I have concentrated on problems of managing international businesses. This represents an extension of prior research on direct investment policy issues but with a more ‘practical’ managerial focus.

    See on larger map