logo logo

Arthur Patrick HURTER Jr.

Arthur Patrick HURTER Jr., economist in the field of Micro economic Theory; Business Investment; Regional Economics. Phi Lambda Upsilon; Sigma Xi; Tau Beta Pi (Distinguished Engineer); Fellow, United States Social Science Research Council, United Kingdom or United States of America; National Nominating Committee, Oregon Society American; Science and Technological Advisory Committee, Illinois Institute, Institution Natural Resources.

Background

  • HURTER Jr., Arthur Patrick was born in 1934 in Chicago, Illinois, United States of America.

  • Education

    • Bachelor of Science (Chemical Engineering), Master of Science (Chemical Engineering), Master of Arts, Doctor of Philosophy Northwestern University, 1955, 1956, 1958, 1962.

    Career

    • Research Association, Transportation Center, Northwestern University, 1961-1965. Assistant Professor, Association Professor, Industrial Engineering and Management Sciences, Northwestern University, 19672-6, 1966-1970. Professor, Industrial Engineering and Management Sciences, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois, United States of America, 1970-.

      Association Editor, American Institute, Institution Industrial Engineering Transaction, 1975-1981.

    Major achievements

    • Phi Lambda Upsilon; Sigma Xi. Tau Beta Pi (Distinguished Engineer). Fellow, United States Social Science Research Council, United Kingdom or United States of America.

      National Nominating Committee, Oregon Society American. Science and Technological Advisory Committee, Illinois Institute, Institution Natural Resources.

    Views

    Through the years, I have attempted to combine my interest and training in economics and operations research. Certain topics such as transportation, plant and equipment investment, facility location, regional, and environmental economics form the focus of my work. This is manifest in over fifty publications, in my classroom lectures, and in the training of more than twenty Doctor of Philosophy students.

    Recently, I have been particularly concerned with developing models of individual decision-making units which include facility design (productiveinvestment) and facility location. These considerations are not treated in an integrated manner in either the economics or the operations research literature. The integration of productioninvestment location considerations leads to a complex model, making solution difficult.

    I have contributed to methods for the solution of these problems, and continue to work on better methods. The concept of input substitutability in the design problem is central to this effort whether in a stock-flow production function or in activity analysis representation. Uncertainty in prices and in the production process has been introduced along with von Neumann-Morgenstein utility functions.

    These models and solution techniques are currently under development. The models of production-investment-location decisions are appropriate for the evaluation of the regional or locational effects of tax policies and regulations (eg. environmental). For example, certain kinds of taxes may lead strongly risk-averse firms to choose a location for a new plant different from one they would choose under an alternative tax yielding the same revenue.

    Finally, my work on production-investment-location models has led me again to pursue one of my major interests, environmental economics. In this instance, investigation of multi-attribute production-investmentlocation models has led naturally to a consideration of location decisions for hazardous or toxic facilities.

    See on larger map