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Nathaniel H. LEFF

Nathaniel H. LEFF, economist in the field of Economic Development; Macroeconomics; International Business. Phi Beta Kappa, Magna Cum Laude, Harvard College; Seager Fellow, International Fellow, Columbia University; NDFL Fellow, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Mass., USA; IBM Fellow International Business Studies, 1976; Tinker Research Fellow, 1978; Book Award, American History Association, 1983.

Background

  • LEFF, Nathaniel H. was born in 1938 in New York City, New York, United States of America.

  • Education

    • Bachelor of Arts Harvard University, 1959. Master of Arts Columbia University, 1962. Doctor of Philosophy (Political Science) Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Mass., USA, 1966.

    Career

    • Research Association, Center Studies Education and Development, Center International Affairs, Harvard University, 1965-1967. Assistant Professor, Association Professor, Columbia Business School, 1967-1970,1970-1973. Association Professor, Tel Aviv University, 1972-1973.

      Visiting Professor, Princeton University, 1977. Professor Business Economics and International Business, Graduate School Business, Columbia University, New York, United States of America, since 1973.

    Major achievements

    • Phi Beta Kappa, Magna Cum Laude, Harvard College. Seager Fellow, International Fellow, Columbia University. NDFL Fellow, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Mass., USA.

      IBM Fellow International Business Studies, 1976. Tinker Research Fellow, 1978. Book Award, American History Association, 1983.

    Views

    I am interested in the economics of the less developed countries, and have focussed mainly on positive analysis. Preferring to work within a well-specified framework, I did much of my early work in the context of a single country, Brazil. That research included an industry study (on an industry whose rapid development raised questions concerning some accepted assumptions in the field of development economics), and a book on economic policy-making.

    That work led to research on macroeconomic and trade problems. Subsequent papers have focussed on savings behaviour, macroeconomic adjustment, transfer of technology, industrial organisation and entrepreneurship. I have found economic theory a very useful tool for understanding less developed economies.

    In addition, I have found historical studies valuable for clarifying the analytics of long-term development. In that vein, I have done a twovolume study of Brazil’s economic experience in the 125 years between Independence and World War II. This time span raises interesting analytical questions, for it includes both a long period of relative stagnation and the shift (circa 1900) to sustained, rapid development. More recently, I have been working on macroeconomic adjustment, on approaches to investment choice and on the use of research.

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