logo logo

Herman P. MILLER

Herman P. MILLER, economist in the field of Economic and Social Statistics; Demographic Economics; Human Capital. Fellow, American Statistical Association; Gold Medal for Meritorious Service, United States Department Commerce.

Background

  • MILLER, Herman P. was born in 1921 in New York City, New York, United States of America.

  • Education

    • BSS City College New York, 1942. Master of Arts George Washington University, 1950. Doctor of Philosophy American University, 1954.

    Career

    • Chief, Consumer Income, Project Director, History Statistics United States, Special Assistant Director, Chief Population Division, United States Bureau of Census, 1947-1972. Adjuct. Professor of Economics, American University, 1959-1964, University of California, Los Angeles, Calif., United States of America, 1964-1965, Temple University, 1967-1974, George Washington University 1971. President, H. P. Miller Incorporated, Economics Consultant, Silver Spring, Maryland, United States of America.

    Major achievements

    • Fellow, American Statistical Association. Gold Medal for Meritorious Service, United States Department Commerce.

    Views

    During the first 30 years of my career (from 1942-1972) my efforts were largely devoted to research pertaining to income distribution in the United States. During this period I worked on the development of household surveys of income data at the Bureau of Census. I developed procedures for collecting, processing and tabulating these data and wrote books and articles appraising the results and interpreting the findings.

    These surveys are now an established part of the statistical tools in the United States and abroad. Since 1972 I have been working largely as a self-employed consulting, forensic economist, who applies economic theories and data to the courtroom in cases involving loss of income due to death, injury, discrimination and other factors. My conclusions have been incorporated in the findings of appellate courts in several jurisdictions, thereby exerting a significant influence on the case law in the United States involving wrongful death and personal injury.

    See on larger map