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Ronald Gene RIDKER

Ronald Gene RIDKER, economist in the field of Demographic Economics; Economic Development Models and Theories. Adviser, Population Resource Center, Public Interest Economics Center, Technology and World Population Study, United States Office Technology Assessment, 1979-1980.

Background

  • RIDKER, Ronald Gene was born in 1931 in Chicago, Illinois, United States of America.

  • Education

    • Bachelor of Arts University California Berkeley, 1952. Master of Arts (International Relations) Fletcher School Law and Diplomacy, 1953. Doctor of Philosophy University Wisconsin, 1958.

    Career

    • Fulbright Scholar, 1955-1956. Instructor, Assistant Professor, Washington University, St Louis, 1956-1958, 1958-1964. Director Economics, Air Pollution Project, United States Public Health Service, 1963-1965.

      Association Professor of Economics, Maxwell School, Syracuse University, 1964-1967. Visiting Research Professor International Economics, Brookings Institute, Institution, 1965-1966. Assistant Chief, Chief Policy Planning Division, United States Agency International Development, 1966-1967, 1969-1970.

      Economics Adviser, USAID Mission India, New Delhi, 1967-1969. Director, Program, Population Resources and the Environment, Resources for Future, 1970-1980. Consultant, United Nations Educational Scientific and Cultural Organisation, Thailand, 1963, Hudson Institute, Institution, 1964-1967, United States Commission Population Growth, 1970-1972, International Labour Office, Population and Labor Policy Branch, 1975, Ford Foundation, Manila, 1979, Argonne National Laboratory, 1979.

      Senior Economics Policy Planning Division, World Bank, Washington, District of Columbia.

    Major achievements

    • Adviser, Population Resource Center, Public Interest Economics Center, Technology and World Population Study, United States Office Technology Assessment, 1979-1980.

    Views

    While I have worked in a variety of fields, one characteristic of most of my work has been the attempt to integrate disparate elements of a picture to answer specific, concrete questions. This was true in attempting to explain the linkage between discontent and economic growth, and between population, resources and environmental pressures, and in trying to understand the determinants (mostly economic) of population growth that would be amenable to policy influence and then apply what was learned to the design of specific population control programmes. It was even true in attempting to develop an integrated picture of the economic costs of air pollution.

    Most recently I have turned on a full-time basis to economic development problems, which of course also require an integrative approach.

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