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Gideon ROSENBLUTH

Gideon ROSENBLUTH, German economist in the field of Economic Fluctuatons; Market Structure; Public Policy towards Monopoly. United States Social Science Research Council, United Kingdom or United States of America Training Fellow, National Bureau of Economie Research, New York, New York, United States of America, New York, 1950-1951; President, Canadian Economie Association, 1978-1979, Canadian Association University Teachers, 1966-1967; Fellow, Royal Society Canada.

Background

  • ROSENBLUTH, Gideon was born in 1921 in Berlin, Germany.

  • Education

    • Bachelor of Arts University Toronto, 1943. Doctor of Philosophy Columbia University, 1953.

    Career

    • Assistant Economics, Research Division, Wartime Prices and Trade Board, Ottawa, 1943-1946. State, Canadian Labour and Prices Division, Ottawa, 1946-1948. Economics, Economics Research and Development Branch, Canadian Department Trade and Commerce, Ottawa, 1949.

      Instructor, Princeton University, 1949-1950. Research Association, National Bureau of Economie Research, New York, New York, United States of America, New York, 1951-1952. Assistant Professor of Economics, Stanford University, 1952-1954.

      Association Professor of Economics, Queen’s University, 1954-1962. Visiting Association Professor, University Washington, 1961. Professor of Economics, University British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, since 1962.

      Editorial Board, Managing Editor, Canadian Journal of Economics, 1976-1978, 1972-1976. Editorial Board, Western Economics Review, since 1984.

    Major achievements

    • United States Social Science Research Council, United Kingdom or United States of America Training Fellow, National Bureau of Economie Research, New York, New York, United States of America, New York, 1950-1951. President, Canadian Economie Association, 1978-1979, Canadian Association University Teachers, 1966-1967. Fellow, Royal Society Canada.

    Views

    My main interest has been in empirical research that would improve our understanding of how the Canadian economy works and contribute to the appraisal of government policies. I have pursued this interest in the field of industrial organisation where I have contributed to the quantitative study of concentration, its causes and effects, and have applied the economist’s tools to the positive analysis of the government’s competition policy. In the same general area I have worked on the peculiarly Canadian problem of foreign ownership and control of Canadian industry, both as a phenomenon to be explained and as a problem of public policy. A second focus of interest has been the relation between business fluctuations in the United States and Canada.

    The study that I consider my most important contribution in this field, using spectral techniques, is unpublished but served as foundation for the work of others. From my early days as a statistician in the Federal government, I have retained an interest in the construction and use of macroeconomic statistics. This has led to some contributions to the theory of input-output models.

    I have also applied input-output analysis to the study of the economic impact in Canada of Canadian and United States military expenditures as part of a study of the economics of disarmament. Academic self-interest, I guess, has caused me to study the economics of universities and the related problems of government policy. This has led, by natural stages, to an interest in the economics of scholarly publishing, the economics of publishing in general, and government financial support of cultural activities. Recent political developments in British Columbia have aroused my interest, along with that of some of my colleagues, in the economics of regional development, and the development of this particular region in particular.

    The resulting research programme is now producing a number of significant papers.

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