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Finis R WELCH

Finis R WELCH, economist in the field of Labour Market Studies, Wages, Employment. Fellow, Econometric Society, 1980; Member, National Academy Education, 1980, Member, Conference Income and Wealth, National Bureau of Economie Research, New York, New York, United States of America, 1984.

Background

  • WELCH, Finis R was born in 1938 in Olney, Texas, United States of America.

  • Education

    • Bachelor of Science University Houston, 1961. Doctor of Philosophy University Chicago, 1965.

    Career

    • Assistant Professor of Economics, University Chicago, 1964-1966. Association Professor of Economics, Southern Methodist University, Dallas, 9. Research Association, National Bureau of Economie Research, New York, New York, United States of America, New York, 1969-1973.

      Executive Officer, Doctor of Philosophy Program Economics, City University New York, 1971-1973. Director, Labour and Population Studies Program, Rand Corporation, Santa Monica, California, 1973-1978. President, Unicon Research Corporation, Santa Monica, California, 84.

      Professor of Economics, University of California, Los Angeles, Calif., United States of America, California, United States of America, since 1978. President, Welch Association, Santa Monica, California, United States of America, since 1984. Editorial Boards, American Economic Review, 7, American Journal of Agricultural Economics, 1974-1977, Economics Education Review, since 1979, J. Labor Research, since 1980, Journal of Economic Literature, since 1980, J. Labor Economics, since 1982.

    Major achievements

    • Fellow, Econometric Society, 1980. Member, National Academy Education, 1980, Member, Conference Income and Wealth, National Bureau of Economie Research, New York, New York, United States of America, 1984.

    Views

    My work concentrates on determinants of labour earnings and is intensely empirical. Early work on returns to schooling was followed by a prolonged series on group differences in earnings. Several compare blacks and whites and one contrasts Hispanics and Anglos.

    Much of the work is descriptive, characterising patterns and the evolution of group differences through time. The behavioural work, in the context of competitive markets, concentrates on determinants of major swings in earnings patterns. Income differences by age, schooling level, and race are examined for responses to changes in labour force composition and protective legislation.

    Analysis of effects of cohort size on age-learning profiles traces early results and future implications for the baby boom cohorts. Effects of rising education levels are contrasted with growth in labour productivity and cyclical swings in tracing changes in patterns of income differences by schooling. Currently involved with implications of modern and discriminatory legislation, together with its enforcement apparatus, and the comparison of evolving patterns of income and employment differences between those protected and those not protected by the legislation.

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