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Floyd Joy Mayweather Jr.

Floyd Joy Mayweather, Jr. is an American professional boxer. He is undefeated as a professional and is a five-division world champion, having won eleven world titles and the lineal championship in four different weight classes.

Background

  • Mayweather was born in Grand Rapids, Michigan, on February 24, 1977, into a family of boxers. His father, Floyd Mayweather Sr., was a former welterweight contender who fought Hall of Famer Sugar Ray Leonard. His uncles (Jeff Mayweather and Roger Mayweather) were professional boxers, with Roger – Floyd's former trainer – winning two world championships, fought Hall of Famers Julio César Chávez, Pernell Whitaker and Kostya Tszyu. Mayweather was born with his mother's last name, but his last name would change to Mayweather shortly thereafter Mayweather attended Ottawa Hills High School before he dropped out.

  • Career

    • Amateur career and Olympics:

      1.Mayweather had an amateur record of 84–6 and won national Golden Gloves championships in 1993 (at 106 lb), 1994 (at 114 lb), and 1996 (at 125 lb).

      2.Mayweather had an amateur record of 84–6 and won national Golden Gloves championships in 1993 (at 106 lb), 1994 (at 114 lb), and 1996 (at 125 lb).

      3.At the 1996 Olympics in Atlanta, Mayweather won a bronze medal by reaching the semi-finals of the featherweight (57-kg) division.

      Professional career:

      Super featherweight

      Mayweather fought his first professional bout on October 11, 1996 against fellow newcomer Roberto Apodaca, who was knocked out in round two. Mayweather's trainer at the time was his uncle, Roger Mayweather;From 1996 to early 1998, Mayweather won most of his fights by knockout or TKO.

      Mayweather vs. Hernandez

      In 1998, within two years of entering professional boxing, Mayweather decisively won his first world title (the WBC super featherweight (130 lb) championship) with an eighth-round technical knockout of The Ring world #1-ranked super featherweight Genaro Hernández after his opponent's cornerman stopped the fight. It was Hernández' first defeat in that weight class.

      Mayweather's third title defense was against Justin Juuko, which he won via knockout in the ninth round. His final title defense in 1999 was against Carlos Gerena, with Mayweather winning in a seventh-round referee technical decision (RTD). This dominance did not go unnoticed in the boxing world; by the end of the year, the 22-year-old Mayweather was ranked The Ring's #2 pound-for-pound best boxer in the world (behind Roy Jones, Jr.)

      Before making the fifth successful defense of his title against former WBC Featherweight Champion Gregorio Vargas in early 2000, Mayweather fired his father as his manager and replaced him with James Prince. Mayweather, in his fifth title defense, won a near-shutout over "Goyo" Vargas in Las Vegas.

      Mayweather vs. Corrales

      In one of the more definitive and memorable fights of his career Mayweather fought the hard-hitting, former IBF super-featherweight champion Diego Corrales. Coming into the bout Mayweather and Corrales were undefeated, and neither fighter had touched the canvas. Before the fight was announced Mayweather had stated he wanted to fight Corrales, who was facing jail time for allegedly beating his pregnant wife.

      In the bout, Mayweather won every round and knocked down Corrales five times (three times in round 7 and twice in round 10). After the fifth knockdown, Corrales' cornermen climbed onto the apron and stopped the fight, thereby establishing Mayweather as a claimant to boxing's mythical pound-for-pound title.

      On May 26, 2001 Floyd Mayweather, fighting in his hometown of Grand Rapids, pounded out a 12-round unanimous decision over future IBF super featherweight titleholder Carlos Hernández to retain his WBC super-featherweight title.

      Mayweather's last fight in the super-featherweight division was against future super featherweight and lightweight titleholder Jesús Chávez. Chávez was the WBC's top-ranked contender and came into the fight with a 31-bout winning streak. This was Mayweather's eighth defense of the WBC super-featherweight title, which he had held for more than three years. He won when Chávez's corner stopped the fight after round nine. Mayweather had such difficulty making weight for this fight that he did not eat for four days before the weigh-in.

      Lightweight

      Mayweather vs. Castillo I

      In his first fight as a lightweight, Mayweather took on World Boxing Council (WBC) champion and The Ring #1-ranked lightweight José Luis Castillo. He defeated Castillo, winning the WBC and vacant Ring lightweight titles with a 12-round unanimous decision at the MGM Grand Garden Arena before a crowd of 6,920. With Mayweather's win, he became the first Ring lightweight champion since Pernell Whitaker. On April 19, 2003 Mayweather defended his WBC lightweight title in a unanimous decision over Dominican Victoriano Sosa.

      Light welterweight

      Mayweather, at 27, made his 140-pound debut by defeating former titlist DeMarcus "Chop Chop" Corley, knocking him down twice officially in rounds eight and ten and scoring a decision of 119–108 (twice) and 119–107. The fight was billed as a WBC elimination bout, with the winner earning a shot at 140-pound champion Arturo Gatti. Shortly after this fight Mayeather would reach #1 on the USA TODAY pound-for-pound rankings, with middleweight champion Bernard Hopkins at #2.

      On January 22, 2005 Mayweather fought Henry Bruseles in another WBC elimination bout, outclassing Bruseles throughout the first seven rounds. In round eight, Mayweather knocked Bruseles down twice and the fight was stopped. Mayweather's victory made him the mandatory challenger for Gatti's WBC light welterweight championship.

      Mayweather vs. Gatti

      The pay-per-view fight between Mayweather and Arturo Gatti took place June 25, 2005 in Atlantic City, New Jersey, where fans heavily supported Gatti. Gatti's corner stopped the fight after round six, giving Mayweather his third world title.

      Welterweight

      After his fight with Gatti, Mayweather moved up to the welterweight division. On November 19, 2005, Mayweather fought a non-title bout at 147 lb (67 kg) against welterweight Sharmba Mitchell. In round three, Mayweather knocked Mitchell down with a straight right hand to the head. In round six another straight right hand—this one to Mitchell's body—dropped Mitchell again, ending the fight.

      Mayweather vs. Judah

      On April 8, 2006, Mayweather defeated Zab Judah for the IBF welterweight title in a unanimous decision. Plans for the fight had been jeopardized after Judah lost the WBA, WBC and The Ring Welterweight titles to Carlos Baldomir on January 7, 2006; however, Mayweather's and Judah's camps reworked the contract and decided that the fight would go on.

      Mayweather vs. Baldomir

      Despite having not lost in over eight years, Baldomir was an underdog in the fight. Mayweather defeated him for both titles in a unanimous decision. Mayweather earned $8 million for the fight; Baldomir was paid $1.6 million, career earnings highs for each fighter at the time. With Mayweather's win, he became the first fighter since Roberto Durán to have captured The Ring titles in both the lightweight and welterweight divisions. He also captured his third lineal championship in as many weight classes (super featherweight, lightweight and welterweight), following in the footsteps of Henry Armstrong and Sugar Ray Leonard.

      Light middleweight

      Mayweather vs. De La Hoya

      Mayweather's next match was the long-anticipated fight against six-division champion and WBC light-middleweight titleholder Oscar De La Hoya on May 5, 2007. Including percentages De La Hoya earned $58 million for the bout, the highest purse ever for a fighter; the previous record was $35 million, held by Tyson and Holyfield. Mayweather earned about $25 million for the fight.

      Also he has had many other fights, in 2015 he plans to retire.

      Boxing record

      Total fights 48

      Wins 48

      Wins by KO 26

      Losses 0

      Draws 0

      No contests 0

    Major achievements

    • Mayweather is a two-time Ring magazine Fighter of the Year (winning the award in 1998 and 2007).

      Won the Boxing Writers Association of America (BWAA) Fighter of the Year award in 2007,2013 and the Best Fighter ESPY Award in 2007, 2008, 2010, 2012, 2013, and 2014 Mayweather was honored with The Best Ever Award by Spike TV in 2015.

      Mayweather is the WBC, WBA, WBO and Ring welterweight champion, and the WBC Super, WBA, and Ring junior middle weight champion. He is also rated as the best pound-for-pound boxer in the world by many sporting news and boxing websites, including Ring, Sports Illustrated, ESPN, BoxRec, Fox Sports, and Yahoo! Sports.

      Mayweather topped the Forbes and Sports Illustrated lists of the 50 highest-paid athletes of 2012 and 2013, and the Forbes list again in 2014, listing Mayweather as the highest paid athlete in the world.

      Mayweather had also founded Mayweather Promotions in 2007, his own boxing promotional firm after defecting from Bob Arum's Top Rank.

    Politics

    America’s first black president is the center of Mayweather’s political universe. He says that every other time an election came around, he was busy doing something else. But in 2008 when Obama was running for his first term in office, he not only voted, but felt it was his duty to get everyone else he knew to vote. He even stood behind the President when he came out in support of gay marriage–which wasn’t a very popular move in the black community. But that doesn’t mean he’s got anything bad to say about Obama’s Republican predecessor with whom he met in 2011.

    Religion

    Mayweather is a Christian, and he makes it a point to thank God before and after fights.12 He feels that God gave him talent as a boxer, and he owes the Big Man credit for picking him to succeed over his opponents.

    Denomination: Orthodox

    Views

    "My whole outlook on life is, never judge a book by its cover".

    Quotations: A true champion can adapt to anything.

    You have good days, you have bad days. But the main thing is to grow mentally.

    A true champion will fight through anything.

    Everything people say I couldn't do I've done.

    I'm looking to expand my portfolio while I'm on top and while I'm young.

    Boxing is real easy. Life is much harder.

    f I'm scared and I'm a coward, why do you guys want to see me fight?

    You have to protect yourself at all times. What goes around comes around.

    I knew boxing before I knew anything else.

    I am the best. There is nobody better than me.

    I basically raised myself.

    The difference between me and any other fighter is they’re talented, I’m God-gifted. There’s a difference. God gives certain individuals gifts and boxing is one of my gifts.

    Personality

    Height 5 ft 8 in (1.73 m)

    Reach 72 in (183 cm)

    Connections

    • Single, has 4 children
    • a father: Floyd Mayweather, Sr. - American - boxing trainer
      His father (born January 15, 1952) is an American boxing trainer and a welterweight contender during the 1980s. Floyd Sr. is known for his defensive ability and overall knowledge of boxing strategy. He is also credited for teaching his son the defensive skills that made him a champion
    • an uncle: Roger Mayweather - boxer
    • an uncle: Jeff Mayweather - boxer
    Floyd Mayweather Jr.
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    Born February 24, 1977
    (age 40)
    Nationality
    • 1993 - 2015

    Official Titles

    Award

    Contributor  

    Dasha Novik last changed 01/07/2015 view changes
    • Relatives
      • Jeff Mayweather
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