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Arnold Paul Pascoe Edit Profile

a New Zealand architect

Arnold Paul Pascoe designed airport terminal buildings for Christchurch International Airport (late 1950s), Wellington International Airport (late 1960s), and Rarotonga International Airport (early 1970s). He was chairman or president of the Canterbury Society of Arts, the Canterbury branch of the NZIA, the Design Association of New Zealand and the Christchurch Architectural Association.

Background

Arnold Paul Pascoe was born at Christchurch on 26 September 1908. He was the younger of twin sons of Guy Dobrée Pascoe, a solicitor, and his wife, Effie Denham.

Education

Following schooling at Sumner and Christ’s College, Paul commenced architectural training in 1927. He was articled to the successful Christchurch architect Cecil Wood and from 1928 to 1933 completed papers for an associateship with the New Zealand Institute of Architects at Canterbury College.

Career

Pascoe began a brief partnership with Cecil Wood in 1937. By December 1938, however, he had entered practice on his own account. The Second World War curtailed modern design projects and Pascoe was forced to develop broader architectural interests. He worked as advisory architect to the National Centennial Council and did some teaching. Towards the end of the war Pascoe was joined in practice by Humphrey Hall. The partners became prominent in Canterbury for their domestic designs, and their preference for translating and adapting modern international ideas to suit New Zealand conditions brought Pascoe and Hall a reputation as one of the foremost modern architectural firms in the country. Pascoe and Hall designed over a hundred residential and commercial buildings during their decade-long partnership. In 1955 Pascoe again chose to practise alone. Soon after, he was commissioned to design new terminal buildings at Christchurch International Airport. In 1963 Pascoe formed a partnership with Walter Linton. in 1967 the firm was appointed to work with Wellington City Corporation architects on the design of a new airport terminal at Rongotai. In the early 1970s Pascoe designed a third airport building, at Rarotonga. In 1961 Pascoe was elected a fellow of the New Zealand Institute of Architects and the following year a fellow of the Royal Institute of British Architects. He was chairman or president of several professional bodies, including the Canterbury Society of Arts, the Canterbury branch of the NZIA, the Design Association of New Zealand and the Christchurch Architectural Association. He was also the New Zealand contributor to the international journals Architectural Review (London) and L’Architecture d’Aujourd’hui (France). From the early 1970s Pascoe began doing less architectural work and lived in semi-retirement.

Achievements

  • He designed airport terminal buildings for Christchurch International Airport (late 1950s), Wellington International Airport (late 1960s), and Rarotonga International Airport (early 1970s). He remodelled the chapel at Christ’s College, planned the Christchurch cathedral’s east-end extensions, and designed the new St Chad’s Church, Linwood, and the interdenominational chapel at Arthur’s Pass.

Works

  • airport

    • Wellington International Airport

      (Wellington International Airport (formerly known as Rongo...)

      1967
    • Rarotonga International Airport

      (Rarotonga International Airport located in the town and d...)

      1975
    • Christchurch International Airport

      (Christchurch International Airport is the main airport th...)

      1955
  • article

    • "The modern house"

      1947

Personality

A pioneer of modern architecture in Christchurch and New Zealand, Pascoe’s contribution to building design continued to be recalled in the name of the firm he co-founded with Walter Linton.

Interests

  • Other Interests

    Pascoe was keenly interested in the study of comparative religion, and was chairman of a new churches research group. He also loved music. Like his twin, who had become a prominent mountaineer, Paul enjoyed tramping and climbing, especially in the Arthur’s Pass and Springfield areas.

Connections

On 30 November 1940 he married Annette Rochfort Sellars at Christchurch; they were to have three sons.

father:
Guy Dobrée Pascoe - a solicitor

mother:
Effie Denham