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Herbert Hugo LIEBHAFSKY

economist

Herbert Hugo LIEBHAFSKY, economist in the field of General Economic Theory; Economic Methodology; Industrial Organisation and Public Policy. Member, Michigan Bar, 1949; Fred. M. Taylor Award Economics Theory, University Michigan, 1955; Life Member, Board Supervisors, Indian Institute, Institution Economics Research (Shartiya Arthik Shedth Dansthan), 1980.

Background

LIEBHAFSKY, Herbert Hugo was born in 1919 in Shiner, Texas, United States of America.

Education

Bachelor of Arts, Master of Science Texas A&M University, 1940, 1941. Juris Dr University Michigan Law School, 1949. Doctor of Philosophy University Michigan, 1956.

Career

United States Army, 1942. Economics, United States Department State, Washington, District of Columbia, 53. Instructor, University Michigan, 1953-1956.

Assistant Professor, University Texas-Austin, 61. Professor of Economics, University Texas Austin, Austin, Texas, United States of America, 1961-. Editorial Boards, Southern Economic Journal, 6, American Economics, 1964-1969, Varta, 1980.

Achievements

  • Member, Michigan Bar, 1949. Fred. M. Taylor Award Economics Theory, University Michigan, 1955. Life Member, Board Supervisors, Indian Institute, Institution Economics Research (Shartiya Arthik Shedth Dansthan), 1980.

Views

My early work was concerned primarily with various interpretations and implications of the Slutsky Equation and microeconomic theory generally, with some work also in the area of international economics based on my experience in the United States Dept, of State. I became particularly interested in the restrictions imposed upon the demand functions by various interpretations of the Marshallian constancy assumption. With the rise of the Chicago school’s price-theory-is-jurisprudence notions, I turned my interest as a lawyer to a critical evaluation of these notions.

More recently, my interest has turned to a further probing of John Dewey’s ‘experimentalisin’ as an approach to social science and, in particular, to a study of the literature of three generations of institutionalist economic literature, ranging from Veblen, Commons and Mitchell to the present day.