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Joseph Cooke Jackson Edit Profile

lawyer , brigadier general

Joseph Cooke Jackson, American lawyer, brigadier general. Club and grand marshal of citizen night parade of over 60,000 Republican voters assembled from different states, in New York City, 1889.

Background

Jackson, Joseph Cooke was born on August 5, 1835 in Newark, New Jersey, United States. Son of Honorary John P. and Elizabeth (Huntington Wolcott) Jackson.

Education

Bachelor of Arts, Yale, 1857, A.M., 1860. Bachelor of Laws, New York University, 1859. Bachelor of Laws, Harvard, 1860.

Admitted to New York bar, 1860, and began practice at New New York Delaware Republican National Convention, Chicago, 1861. Volunteered on fall of Fort Sumter and was ordered to staff of General Robert Anderson, United States of America. Second in command Lieutenant 1st New Jersey Vols., and assigned to staff General Philip Kearny.

Promoted to div. staff of Maj, General Franklin, October 11, 1861. Commissioned captain and aide-de-camp vols., August 20, 1862, “for gallantry during Seven Days’ Battles before Richmond,” and assigned to Sixth Corps staff as aide-de-camp to General Franklin. Commissioned lieutenant colonel 26th New Jersey Infantry, December 2, 1862.

Served in nearly 30 engagements of war as aide-de-camp on staffs of Generals Anderson, Kearny, Franklin, Meade and Wool, United States of America, in campaigns of McDowell, McClellan, Pope, Burnside and Meade. Bvtd. colonel vols., March 13, 1865, “for gallant and meritorious conduct at battle of Fredericksburg, Virginia,” September 13, 1862. Aide-de-camp to General Wool, United States of America, quelling July riots, 1863.

Bvtd. brigadier general vols., March 13, 1865, “for faithful and meritorious services in the field”. Resigned, January 5, 1863. While holding present commission of brigadier general United States.V. was also commissioned aide-de-camp to Governor Marcus L. Ward, New Jersey, in Reconstruction period.

During war was appointed by Secretary Stanton special War Department commissioner United States Naval Credits, and established 1,900 naval enlistments, which were credited to quota of troops from New Jersey, and thereby rendered a draft unnecessary and saved nearly $1,000,000 to the state. Admitted to Supreme Court of the United States Court, 1864. Delegate Ship Canal Convention, Chicago, 1864.

Resumed general law practice, New York, near close of war and for nearly 30 years was attorney and counsel for railways, banks, express and other corporations.

Career

Honorary Calvin and Catherine (Seymour) Day, October 12, 1864. Appointed by President Grant, assistant attorney, Southern District New York, 1870. Was counsel for Society of Political Reform which created first Committee of 70.

Counsel for removal police commissioner. Also New York Bar Association and New York Supreme Court in their proceedings to purify New York bar. Active in Law Institute and committee of bar association.

Retired from office engagements, 1890. Organizer by request of New York Republican Club and grand marshal of citizen night parade of over 60,000 Republican voters assembled from different states, in New York City, 1889. Campaign and convention speaker and liberal contributor to Republican measures.

Was an original founder of the earliest American college local alumni association (Yale). Its treasurer, vice president, and member Executive Committee many years. Trustee Vice-President De Milt Dispensary 15 years Home: New York, New York.

Membership

Club and grand marshal of citizen night parade of over 60,000 Republican voters assembled from different states, in New York City, 1889.

Connections

Married Katharine Perkins, d.

father:
Honorary John P. Jackson

mother:
Elizabeth (Huntington Wolcott) Jackson

spouse:
Katharine Perkins