Log In

Richard Emerson Wiley Edit Profile

Richard E. Wiley served as chairman of the Federal Communications Commission from March 8, 1974 – October 12, 1977; where he advocated increased competition and lessened regulation in the communications field.


Wiley, Richard Emerson was born on July 20, 1934 in Peoria, Illinois, United States. Son of Joseph Henry and Jean W. (Farrell) Wiley.


Bachelor of Science with distinction, Northwestern University, 1955. Juris Doctor, Northwestern University, 1958. Master of Laws, Georgetown University, 1962.

Doctor of Laws (honorary), Catholic University of America, 1998.


Wiley played a pivotal role in the development of HDTV in the United States, serving from 1987 to 1995 as chairman of the FCC’s Advisory Committee on Advanced Television Service. In 1983, Wiley founded the Washington, D.C. law firm Wiley Rein LLP, home to more than 275 lawyers practicing in almost two-dozen areas of law including communications, government contracts, insurance, international trade, public policy and litigation. Wiley, the firm's managing partner, leads its preeminent 80-attorney communications practice.

Wiley has often been profiled by the media and recognized for his expertise and contributions to the communications industry. He has been called the "Father of High-Definition television" (The Globe and Mail), the "most influential media and telecommunications lawyer in the United States" (the International Herald Tribune) and one of the top "100 Men of the Century" (Broadcasting & Cable). Wiley graduated with distinction from Northwestern University, where he earned BS and JD degrees.

He also holds a master's degree in Law from Georgetown University Law Center and an honorary Doctor of Laws from The Catholic University of America. He has served as chairman/president of The Media Institute, the Center for Telecommunication and Information at Columbia University and the Federal Bar and Federal Communication Bar Associations.


A mature Christian can reach a state where the love of God reigns supreme in the heart. No one can be perfect in an absolute way, as God is. But it is possible to be perfect in love to God.


The state should not use its authority to promote any particular religious belief. It should allow people practice their own religious convictions.


In a society where self-interest, acquisitiveness and individual happiness are often seen as the over-riding interests, the Church, and Christians within it, are called to witness meanings, values and purposes beyond ourselves.


Chairman board Media Institute, since 1999, Institute for Tele-Information, Columbia University, since 1997. Senior fellow Council of Administrative Conference of United States, 2010. Captain Army of the United States, 1959-1962.

Fellow: American Bar Foundation. Member: American Bar Association (chairman Forum committee on communications 1985-1987, house of deals 1969-1971, 1977-1984, chairman young lawyers section 1977-1984, chairman board editors American Bar Association Journal 1984-1989, chairman committee on scope and correlation of work 1989, chairman administrative law & regulatory practice 1993-1994, chairman national law day 2003), Republican National Lawyers Association (board member, co-chairman judicial advocacy panel), Administrative Conference United States (council, senior fellow), Chicago Bar Association, Illinois Bar Association, Federal Communications Bar Association (president 1987), Federal Bar Association 1977, Phi Delta Kappa, Phi Delta Phi.


Married Elizabeth J. Edwards, August 6, 1960. Children: Douglas S., Pamela L.