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Domenico Mario NUTI

economist

Domenico Mario NUTI, Italian economist in the field of General Economic Theory; Comparative Economic Systems; Socialist Economic Systems. Stevenson Prize, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom, 1965; Executive, British National Association Soviet E. European Studies, 1980-1984; Executive, Italian Association Comp. Economics Systems, since 1984.

Background

NUTI, Domenico Mario was born in 1937 in Arezzo, Italy.

Education

Dottore Giurisprudenza University Rome, 1962. Master of Arts, Doctor of Philosophy University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom, 1966, 1970.

Career

Fellow, King’s College, Research Fellow, Tutor, Assistant Lector, Lector Economics Political, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom, 1966-1979, 1966-1969, 73, 1971-1973, 1976-1979. Professor Political Economics, Director, Centre Russian E. European Studies, University Birmingham, 1980-1982. Professor of Economics, European University Institute, Institution, Florence, Italy, since 1982.

Editorial Boards, Cambridge Journal of Economics, since 1977, Economics Planning 1980-1983, Soviet Studies, 1980-1984, Economics Modelling, , Communist Affairs, since 1980.

Achievements

  • Stevenson Prize, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom, 1965. Executive, British National Association Soviet E. European Studies, 1980-1984. Executive, Italian Association Comp.

    Economics Systems, since 1984.

Views

An exploration and development of the Austrian theory of capital and time (steady-state relationships between wage, interest, consumption and growth: valuation of capital and income per man) leading to criticism of aggregate production functions. A detailed investigation of official instructions for the selection of investment projects in the Soviet Union and East European countries. An analysis of recent reforms of industrial organisation in Eastern Europe, their connection with macroeconomic policies and in particular with over-accumulation bias of socialist economies, with special reference to Poland.

A model of politicaleconomic fluctuations and crises in Soviet-type economies.