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Frederick Langenheim Edit Profile

photographer

Frederick Langenheim was a daguerrotypist and calotypist,produced portraits and landscapes as well as his various photographic inventions.

Background

Frederick Langenheim was born in 1809 in Germany.

Career

Having emigrated from Germany, Frederick and his brother William, along with another German, G. F. Schreiber, opened a daguerreotype studio in Philadelphia in the early 1840s. Shortly thereafter they enlisted and fought in the Mexican War. The brothers established the American Stereoscopic Company, which became a major producer of stereo views; they sold it to E. & H. T. Anthony & Company in 1861.

Langenheim and his brother introduced the Petzval-Voigtlander lens to the U.S. in 1842-43, and they were the first to introduce glass transparencies for projection (usually known as lantern slides) in 1846. In 1849, for HOOO, they purchased from Fox Talbot the U.S. rights to his calotype process. In that same year they produced stereoscopic slides on glass or paper based on Niepce de Saint-Victor's albumen process, calling them "hyalotypes."

Achievements

  • PUBLICATIONS Books: The Daguerreotype in America, Beaumont Newhall, 1961, rev. ed., 1968; Photography and the American Scene, Robt. Taft, 1938. Anthologies: The Photograph Collector’s Guide, Lee D. Witkin &. Barbara London, 1979; Early Photographs eP Early Photographers, Oliver Mathews, 1973.

Connections

Brother:
William Langenheim - photographer

distant cousin:
Friedench Voigtlander - optical manufacturer

(1812-78)

coworker:
G. F. Schreiber - German

Frederick and his brother William, along with another German, G. F. Schreiber, opened a daguerreotype studio in Philadelphia.