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HENRY GRAY BARBOUR

pharmacologist , toxicologist

During World War I (1917-1918) Barbour experimented with poison gases for the American government. He ranked among the most eminent American pharmacologists, and was an outstanding authority on body temperatures, a field in which he pioneered. He also made extensive researches into the effects of "heavy water" on mammals, ascertaining that a mammal when only one-fifth saturated with this fluid experienced a speeding up of life processes.

Education

He received an A.B. from Trinity College, Hartford, in 1906

Career

Barbour was a fellow of the latter institution (1910-1911) and conducted research at the universities of Freiburg (1911), Vienna (1912) and London (1913). He was assistant professor of pharmacology at Yale University (1912-1921); professor of pharmacology at McGill University (1921-1923); professor of physiology and pharmacology at the University of Louisville (1923-1931); associate professor of pharmacology and toxicology (1931-1940) and research associate in pharmacology and toxicology (1940- 1943) in the school of medicine, Yale University. During World War I (1917-1918) Barbour experimented with poison gases for the American government.

Achievements

  • He ranked among the most eminent American pharmacologists, and was an outstanding authority on body temperatures, a field in which he pioneered. He also made extensive researches into the effects of "heavy water" on mammals, ascertaining that a mammal when only one-fifth saturated with this fluid experienced a speeding up of life processes.

Works

  • article

    • Experimental Pharmacology and Toxicology(1932)

    • Heat Regulation of Fever