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Richard Sidney SAYERS

economist

Richard Sidney SAYERS, economist in the field of Commercial Banking. President, Section F British Academy, 1960; Vice-President, British Academy, 1966-1967; President, Economics History Society, 1972-1974; Vice president, Royal Economic Society, United Kingdom, 1973-1976; Honorary Fellow, St Catherine’s College Cambridge, London School of Economies and Political Science, London, United Kingdom, Institute, Institution gan.

Background

SAYERS, Richard Sidney was born in 1908 in Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, England.

Education

Master of Arts University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom, 1933. Master of Arts University Oxford, 1936. Honorary DLitt University Warwick, 1967.

Honorary DCL University Kent, 1967.

Career

Assistant Lector Economics, London School of Economies and Political Science, London, United Kingdom, 5. Lector Economics, Exeter, Corpus Christi and Pembroke College Oxford, 1935-1945. Fellow, Pembroke College Oxford, 1939-1945.

Economics, United Kingdom Ministry of Supply, 1940-1945. Economics Adviser, United Kingdom Cabinet Office, 1945-1947. Cassel Professor of Economics, London School of Economies and Political Science, London, United Kingdom, 1947-1968.

Member, United Kingdom Radcliffe Committee Monetary System, 1957-1959. Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development Committee Fiscal Measures, 1966-1968. Member, United Kingdom Monopolies Commission, 1968.

Emeritus Professor of Economics, University London, since 1968.

Achievements

  • President, Section F British Academy, 1960. Vice-President, British Academy, 1966-1967. President, Economics History Society, 1972-1974.

    Vice president, Royal Economic Society, United Kingdom, 1973-1976. Honorary Fellow, St Catherine’s College Cambridge, London School of Economies and Political Science, London, United Kingdom, Institute, Institution gan.

Works

Views

English monetary history. Relationship between monetary policy and theory and institutions, as exemplified in report of the committee on the working of the monetary system (Radcliffe Report) 1959.