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Shelia Yvette Cockrell-Fleming

Shelia Yvette Cockrell-Fleming, American public health nurse. Registered Nurse; certified public health nurse. CPR, first aid instructor American Red Cross. 1st lieutenant United States Air Force, 1985-1988. Member National Council Nurse Administrators, American Diabetes Association.

Background

Cockrell-Fleming, Shelia Yvette was born on July 20, 1961 in Houston, Texas, United States. Daughter of Morgan O. and Alma (Wheeler) Cockrell.

Education

Bachelor of science in nursing, University Texas Health Science Center, Houston, 1983.

Career

Assistant head nurse Harris County Hospital District, Houston, 1988-1989. Perinatal nurse HealthMark, 1989-1990, Memorial Northwest Hospital, Houston, 1990-1991, Lompoc (California) Hospital District, 1991-1992. Public health nurse Santa Barbara County, Lompoc, 1992-1994.

Perinatal nurse Spectrum Health Care, Vendenberg Air Force Base, California, 1994-1996. Director health promotion/disease prevention American Indian Health and Services, Santa Barbara, 1996-1999. President, Chief Executive Officer Sojourner Nurse Consultant, Lompoc, since 1999.

Member advisory board Healthy Start, Lompoc, 1992-1993. Member community advisory board Santa Barbara Health Initiative, since 1997. Member Breast Cancer Early Detection Partnership Santa Barbara County, since 1996.

Religion

Any individual, child, or otherwise cannot be baptized until they come to a saving knowledge of Jesus Christ—then, and only then, would a person be baptized.

Views

Every Christians should study the Bible that contains a variety of inspirational and thoughtful ideas in the field of history, law, and poetry.

Membership

CPR, first aid instructor American Red Cross. 1st lieutenant United States Air Force, 1985-1988. Member National Council Nurse Administrators, American Diabetes Association.

Interests

  • Other Interests

    Avocations: reading, writing.

Connections

Married Wesley T. Fleming, May 25, 1991. 1 child, Khelli E.

Politics

The state should not use its authority to promote particular religious beliefs, nor should it require prayer or worship in the public schools. However, the state should leave students free to practice their own religious convictions.