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Thomas Manton, Jr. Edit Profile

Clergyman

Thomas Manton was an English Puritan clergyman.

Background

Thomas Manton was born in 1620, at Lydeard St. Lawrence, Somerset.

Education

Manton was educated at the free school in Tiverton, Devon, then, at the age of sixteen, went to study at Wadham College, Oxford. He graduated from Oxford with a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1639, a Bachelor of Divinity degree in 1654, and a Doctorate of Divinity degree in 1660.

Career

Manton was ordained in 1640 to the diaconate at age twenty by Joseph Hall, and served for three years as lecturer at the parish church of Sowton, near Exeter, Devonshire. Through the patronage of Colonel Popham, he obtained the living of St. Mary’s, Stoke Newington, London, where his pastorate became a model of consistent, rigorous Calvinism. He soon became a leading Presbyterian in London, and used his influence to encourage ministers to establish Presbyterian church government and to promote public tranquility in troubled times. He was appointed one of three clerks at the Westminster Assembly and preached many times before Parliament during the Commonwealth.

In the mid 1650s, he served several important commissions, including being a commissioner for the approbation of public preachers, or "triers. "

He also served on a committee to help resolve the division in the Church of Scotland between the Resolutioners and the Remonstranters. Then, too, he served on a committee with Thomas Goodwin, John Owen, Henry Jessey, and Richard Baxter for composing articles on the "fundamentals of religion" essential for subscription to the protectorate church.

In 1656, Manton was chosen as lecturer at Westminster Abbey and became rector of St. Paul’s, Covent Garden as Obadiah Sedgwick’s successor. Manton desired to establish Presbyterian discipline at St. Paul’s, but was prevented from doing so by his assistant and parishioners.

After the failure of Richard Cromwell’s protectorate, Manton favored the Restoration of Charles II. He accompanied Charles at Breda and swore an oath of loyalty to the King. Manton was appointed one of twelve chaplains to King Charles II, though he never performed the duties or received the benefits of this office. All the while, Manton remained firmly Presbyterian in his convictions, and warned against the restoration of episcopacy and the Anglican liturgy.

After Manton was ejected from the Church of England pulpits for Nonconformity in 1662, he preached at his house in King Street, Covent Garden, and other private places. Attendance kept increasing until he was arrested in 1670 and imprisoned for six months. When the Declaration of Indulgence was granted in 1672, Manton was licensed as a Presbyterian at his home in Covent Gardne. He also became lecturer for London merchants in Pinner’s Hall and preacher at the revival of the Presbyterian morning exercises.

When the King’s indulgence was annulled in 1675, Manton’s congregation was torn apart. He continued to preach to his aristocratic followers at Covent Garden, however, until his death on October 18, 1677.

Achievements

  • The divine, Thomas Manton is best known for his skilled expository preaching.

Works

Views

Quotations: "Divisions in the church always breed atheism in the world. "

"One way to get comfort is to plead the promise of God in prayer, show Him His handwriting; God is tender of His Word. "

"Men in general do not live as if they looked to die; and therefore do not die as if they looked to live. "

"Faith is the fountain of prayer, and prayer should be nothing else but faith exercised. "

Connections

In 1643, Thomas Manton married Mary Morgan, they had several children.

father:
Thomas Manton, Sr.

wife:
Mary Morgan

daughter:
Ann Manton

daughter:
Mary Manton

son:
James Manton

son:
Thomas Manton

son:
Nathaniel Manton